DIY Camera Sliders

February 15, 2011 — 3 Comments

Like I’ve mentioned before, I’ve been looking at gear to add to my camera tool-set. One of the things I’ve been looking at are camera sliders. Camera sliders are devices that allow you to slide a camera from one spot to another inĀ  a controlled manner. Next time you watch a movie, look for scenes where it looks like someone is “sliding” a camera to the side, shifting the “target point” of the camera. You see it a lot to reveal an object behind another. You can also do “elevator shots” with them allowing you to rise above something or go below something smoothly. It is a pro effect, but can be expensive.

Here is an example of a pro slider – it’ll cost you about $700!

Here is an example of the effect in action:

This is a great effect, and the pro-gear to achieve it can get very expensive. But, in GeekRev style, I’ve found some inexpensive DIY ways to build camera slider rigs that will give you that pro effect for cheap.

First, the uber-cheap camera slider:

Second, here’s one for a little more coin, but still very affordable:

Third, here’s one using a pretty slick pre-made aluminum extrusion, more expensive than the first, but probably a lot more durable:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vi8TCvVuCjw

Fourth, here is a source for a similar aluminum extrusion track system: Amazon: DYI slider track

Finally, here is a hand-crank adaptation that you could adapt to any of these sliders:

I will be building one of these, not sure which one, but I’ll post about it when I do. FYI, YouTube is full of DIY sliders.

herbhalstead

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Herb is the lead pastor at Thrive Church. Herb also does freelance web design, 3D architectural modeling, and works as an architectural designer.

3 responses to DIY Camera Sliders

  1. The hand crank looks pretty sweet, but I’d be so picky as to making sure the move was fluid. Seems there could be a little added to each of these to provide some sort of resistance, or maybe something even automatic.

    • yeah, there is a lot that goes into the fluidity – the smoothness of the carriage ride on the rails, the quality of the crank axle, the tightness of the belt, etc. Lots to tweak.

  2. The 5th most read post at GeekRev today: DIY Camera Sliders http://t.co/nYa0xKzu

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